To: Old-fashioned CTOs who think software development can’t be done part time

As I work to build my new startup fraction.work, I’ve come across the Availability Objection more than once. In essence, it’s some variation of “there’s no way a part-time developer could EVER be effective on MY team!”

In my latest post on the company blog, I outline how availability is a silly objection to fractional work for modern software development organizations. Of course if you’re still insisting all of your employees go into the office 5 days per week, perhaps you’re not modern enough to try this just yet…

Long story short, any CTO or VP of Engineering with a clue knows that half of a senior software developer’s time is worth many times that of most full-time junior developers (whose productivity is actually negative when they first start). So why wouldn’t you consider hiring fractional senior developers to help build your team out?

My experience as a fractional software developer

I started fraction.work earlier this summer, based on my experiences as a fractional software developer earlier in my career, and my experience hiring fractional developers while running HiddenLevers.

Those experiences guide me to believe that there’s a huge market for long-term, part-time software development work (that’s how I define “fractional” software development). We’ve seen fractional CFOs, CMOs, and GCs, but the adoption of this approach has been much slower at the individual contributor level and in particular in technology roles.

This is ironic because software development is more amenable to remote work than any other role – witness the explosive wave of offshore and nearshore development since the pandemic normalized remote work! Employers oddly feel more comfortable working with someone who half a world away and who may not grasp nuances of cultural difference, than working with someone in the US who is available 30 hours a week?

I know this isn’t really true – but many companies have a mental block when it comes to part-time work. As part of normalizing how effective it can be, I detailed the experience on the fraction.work blog – I hope you’ll follow the story there!