Business Ideas IV: Follow My Diet

Idea: Follow My Diet – Help users follow their diet’s guidelines when eating out

MVP: Eating within a diet’s guidelines is challenging for most, and is further complicated when eating out at restaurants. FMD solves this problem by detecting when a user is in a recognized restaurant, and showing only those menu options that meet their diet’s rules (the app would also show how to custom order at restaurants to stay within the diet). At launch the top 100 restaurant chains in America would be supported, representing the majority of all American restaurants – crowdsourcing additional restaurants and menu items should enable coverage to expand quickly from there. FMD will also enable the tracking and optimization of a user’s diet over the course of time – fall off track and the app will let you know what sorts of food choices would put you back on track for the rest of the day or week.

Market:

Roughly 15% of all Americans (45m people) are trying to follow a particular diet at any given time, with total spending in the diet and weight-loss industry exceeding
$33B last year. FMD could market the app toward existing diet providers in the space, as a management tool for their clients. FMD could also find a market in the management
of diabetes and other diseases where diet is an integral part of managing a long-term chronic disease.

With a large potential user b2c user base, freemium or advertising-based business models might make the most sense for FMD – but the possibility of a disease-management oriented approach remains open as well.

 

Idea Score (0-10 scale, up to 2 points per question): 4.5 points

(Overall this idea scored relatively poorly – I think pivoting it toward the health management space, perhaps diabetes or other food-related disease management, could strengthen the business case substantially)

Feasibility of MVP / Market Entry: 1

A substantial amount of restaurant menu data needs to be gathered and maintained in order to enable the app to function – but most of this is readily available and can be parsed online. With major restaurant chains commanding a huge market share in the restaurant industry, it should be possible to gather this data pre-launch in order to enable a functional product at launch.

Revenue Market Size or Eyeballs: 1

While the market size is large (as discussed above), advertising-supported products need to gain substantial scale in order to support a meaningful revenue stream. Since FMD is initially focused on helping dieters eat out, restaurants may be interested in sponsoring the app in order to drive traffic.

In a Growing Market? 1

The market for weight-loss and diet solutions is well established, and on the whole can no longer grow faster than single-digit growth rates. But the market for apps
that help manage diet-related diseases continues to grow rapidly, providing a strong potential growth niche.

Difficult, Barriers to Entry, and Competition 0.5

Numerous competitors exist in the diet app space, and apps even exist to find healthy restaurant options – but none attempt to analyze the mass market restaurant space. This is the opportunity for FMD – fast casual and similar restaurants can be hard to navigate for dieters, but it seems that there are no apps that attempt to solve this menu navigation process in a comprehensive way.

Riding Hype or a Trend? 1

Digital health apps, fitness trackers, and similar are a fast growing space. While diet-related apps operate at the edge of this space, the relationship may provide some halo for a business like FMD.

Business Ideas I: Juggler, Never Let A Message Drop

Over the years I have kept a running spreadsheet of business ideas – my current business, HiddenLevers, was once a denizen of the same spreadsheet. But ideas have expiration dates [1], and my idea list has grown while my available time has shrunk. Over the next few months I will be sharing my ideas – I’d love to hear feedback and to inspire others to take the next step or gain inspiration. To provide structure, for each idea I’ll share my thoughts on what I thought the MVP might be, and a scoring of the idea using my own 10 point scale. Here goes!

Idea: Juggler – Never Let a Message Drop

Juggler would watch your firm’s emails, LinkedIn, and other messaging platforms to ensure that every inbound request is tracked and gets a response. The challenge today is that inbound business communication arrives across channels, and often comes in to many different personnel at your firm. Using AI, Juggler would determine which messages actually require response, and monitor these across all firm users, alerting managing when prospects and clients are awaiting response.

There are a ton of AI-based email solutions and also support email solutions from firms like Zendesk – but none of these seem to focus on this specific use case – firm-wide monitoring and taking a global look at all communications to a particular client.

MVP:

The MVP is simple – do the machine learning work to simply determine whether a particular email requires response. Emails asking questions clearly come to mind – but taking a true machine-learning approach, can we approach 99% accuracy here? This can then be married to a simple UI showing individuals (not messages) requiring attention – this sort of dashboard data could ideally then be integrated into Salesforce or other CRM platforms.

Scoring (0-10 scale): 6 points

1. Is it Transformative? 1 point

This is a fairly standard use of machine learning in 2018 – but the accuracy level required to make this viable is not. Also, many businesses still don’t take real advantage of CRM systems, and this idea automates some of the key value concepts from CRM for a small business (ie don’t let any leads slip through the cracks – I’m looking at you, contractors).

2. Revenue Market Size or Eyeballs: 1 point

This is a broad market – virtually every business could use this capability, so volume pricing of even a few dollars a month in a SaaS solution could scale quickly. Presuming that this capability is worth $5/user/month – the US market alone is greater than a billion per year.

3. In a Growing Market? 1 point

While email utilization is stable, multi-channel communication is growing – think chat, social media, VOIP (phone) – in theory the same approach could be applied to all of these.

4. Difficulty, Barriers to Entry, and Competition: 1 point

It may prove difficult to achieve the level of accuracy with machine-learning to inspire user confidence. If businesses suspect that even a few important messages might be slipping through, they will lose confidence and not use the product. Ideally the system ought to learn based on each user and firm’s data – posing a bit more complexity.

5. Riding Hype or a Trend? 2 points

AI and machine-learning are arguably THE trend of the moment, and while arguable overhyped – the Juggler idea definitely is riding this trend.

 

[1] James Watt’s steam engine was an excellent invention, and applying it to pumping water out of mines an excellent business idea – for the 1770s. The concept of hailing a car via smartphone was likewise a great idea – in 2009. It’s also possible to be too early – Yahoo Briefcase shutdown the same year DropBox was founded (although the latter was also a vastly superior implementation).

 

P.S. Investors out there, feel free to reach out if any ideas in this series are of interest – while my core business continues to grow rapidly, I’m open to discussions on how to seed fund and launch against many of these ideas.